State Policy

It’s time to start preparing for the 2060 Presidential election. No, I’m serious. Today, somewhere in Utah, there are children who could run for President of the United States in 2060 and beyond.

I hope they are nurtured by parents who are economically secure and prepared to parent to the best of their ability. I hope they have stable, affordable, effective health care and have health insurance so they don’t worry about whether they can access care. I hope they have access to quality preschool if they need it so they are ready to learn when they start kindergarten. I hope they are taught by teachers who are valued; who are paid a wage that recognizes the important, valuable influence they have on a child’s intellect and ability to succeed. I hope they live in a community that supports them throughout their lives, that makes sure that all children in the community have what they need to succeed, not just those living in certain zip codes. I hope they live in communities that recognize that care for our environment means healthier, happier kids. And I hope they live in a society that values all life, all nationalities, all humanity. Because that kid could be the hero we need to bring a nation together.

Unfortunately, many kids don’t live this life in Utah today. As Diposh Navsaria said “We fail kids, long before they fail us.” Too many live below poverty in our state, 120,155 to be exact. If you want a visualization, that’s enough kids to fill the Huntsman Center, Vivint Smart Home Arena, Smiths Ballpark, Rice-Eccles Stadium, the Maverick Center, and the Dee Events Center at one time. And we don’t always provide these at-risk kids with the support they need.

All-day kindergarten is not available to all kids; quality, affordable preschool is not available to all kids; we have the lowest per pupil expenditures in the nation in a state where student population increases every year; we have one of the highest rates of uninsured kids in the nation, and we do have the highest rate of uninsured Hispanic kids.

Nationally, we continually fight to keep food stamps from being cut, we worry about cuts to the Children’s Health Insurance Program, we wonder if families will be torn apart in the same breath that we say how much we value families. And everywhere, across this nation and in Utah, sometimes your zip code determines if you succeed or fail. When will be learn that when our children succeed, our city, community, nation, and society succeed.

When will we understand that supporting children and families IS economic development. Because when we support our children, when we raise capable, loving, experienced children they become the bedrock and the foundation, of a successful society.

At Voices for Utah Children we always ask the question, “Is it Good for Kids?” when working on policies affecting children and families. We collect data, we do research, and we share information with experts across the United States. I want to be able to say that the future President of the United States from the great state of Utah could be any child in the state, not just the lucky ones born to the right parents, born in an affluent neighborhood, and born with the best chance of success. When asked “Is it good for the 2060 candidate for President”, I want our state to be able to say “yes, we did the best we could for all our children.” All our children had the opportunity to succeed. Hail to the future Chief!

 


LUGU Logo 1March 30, 2017 is Love UT Give UT!

It’s a day for Utahns to give to the nonprofits that make Utah special. Every donation to Voices for Utah Children through Love UT Give UT gives Voices a chance to win matching grants and prizes—and gives you a chance to win a car!

And you don't have to wait!  Donate now at http://bit.ly/loveUTchildren.

For 30 years now, Voices for Utah Children has called on our state, federal and local leaders to put children’s needs first. But the work is not done. The children of 30 years ago now have children of their own. Too many of these children are growing up in poverty, without access to healthcare or quality educational opportunities.

How can you be involved?

Make a tax-deductible donation to Voices for Utah Children—or join our Network with a monthly donation of $20 or more.  Network membership includes complimentary admission to Network events with food, socializing, and opportunity to meet child advocacy experts. And don't forget to join our listserv to stay informed!

We look forward to the future of Voices for Utah Children and we hope you will be a part of our next 30 years.

Special thanks to American Express for sponsoring our 30th Anniversary Year. Amex

Published in News & Blog

This op-ed by Matthew Weinstein of Voices for Utah Children and Derek Monson of the Sutherland Institute was originally printed in the Salt Lake Tribune on February 18, 2017.

For some children in Utah, poverty is their inheritance. By no choice of their own, they have never experienced life outside the world of welfare dependence.

As these children grow older, they face a daunting choice: continue in the lifestyle they know and grew up in, or transition toward an unfamiliar life of self-reliance. Even if these young people have a healthy desire for the latter, it can be a difficult road with many personal, cultural, educational, economic and policy barriers.

Fortunately, we can do something to tear down some of these barriers. Specifically, the Utah Legislature can start by passing HB294 — Utah Intergenerational Poverty Work and Self-Sufficiency Tax Credit.

This proposal would help those seeking a way out of intergenerational poverty by lowering tax barriers and allowing them to keep more of what they earn through employment. At the federal level, this policy is called the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC). Creating an EITC for Utahns in intergenerational poverty makes sense on several levels.

Utah has been on the forefront of states seeking solutions for intergenerational poverty, and HB294 is a natural extension of those efforts. It provides a helping hand to those in intergenerational poverty when they reach the stage of being able and willing to achieve self-reliance through work.

Intergenerational poverty reflects at least a second generation of poverty, often with the higher level of discouragement and family dysfunction that commonly comes with that experience. It is deeper and tougher to climb out of than stereotypical poverty, which is usually due to a temporary setback like the loss of a job. Giving the full financial and human rewards of self-reliance through earned success to such families makes it more likely that their efforts to stay out of poverty will be successful.

Utah ranks No. 1 in the nation for social mobility. A child growing up in poverty in Utah has a better chance of making it into the middle class than in any other state. This is largely thanks to a culture that embraces two-parent families and a strong work ethic. Utah has the highest rate of two-parent families in the nation, translating into a relatively small share of children growing up in poverty. Utah also has labor force participation rates for both men and women that exceed the national average.

Utah also recently earned a No. 2 ranking in the nation for evidence-based policymaking, as determined by the Pew-MacArthur Results First Initiative. Few policies have as much evidence in support of their effectiveness as the EITC.

A Congressional Research Service report in 2014 found that the federal EITC lowered the proportion of American families in poverty between 14 and 30 percent, depending on marital status and family size. Currently its top advocate in Washington is House Speaker Paul Ryan, who has proposed expanding it further, saying, "This is one of the few programs that have shown results. It encourages people to work by increasing the rewards of work."

The EITC makes sense not only for those in poverty, but for the economy and taxpayers as well. For example, Glenn Hubbard, dean of Columbia Business School and chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers under President George W. Bush, has said, "[the] EITC truly is our best option for supporting work." Stanford University's Hoover Institution has concluded that "the EITC is probably the most cost-effective anti-poverty program the federal government operates."

HB294 would make Utah the 27th state in the nation to enact a state EITC. While this policy will not solve intergenerational poverty, it will add an effective tool to fighting poverty in Utah. It will also provide practical assistance to those seeking to overcome some of the greatest economic challenges that families in Utah face, and at a very reasonable cost.

Just as importantly, it shows that in our communities, we believe that a child's future inheritance should be more than their parents' poverty.


LUGU Logo 1March 30, 2017 is Love UT Give UT!

It’s a day for Utahns to give to the nonprofits that make Utah special. Every donation to Voices for Utah Children through Love UT Give UT gives Voices a chance to win matching grants and prizes—and gives you a chance to win a car!

And you don't have to wait!  Donate now at http://bit.ly/loveUTchildren.

For 30 years now, Voices for Utah Children has called on our state, federal and local leaders to put children’s needs first. But the work is not done. The children of 30 years ago now have children of their own. Too many of these children are growing up in poverty, without access to healthcare or quality educational opportunities.

How can you be involved?

Make a tax-deductible donation to Voices for Utah Children—or join our Network with a monthly donation of $20 or more.  Network membership includes complimentary admission to Network events with food, socializing, and opportunity to meet child advocacy experts. And don't forget to join our listserv to stay informed!

We look forward to the future of Voices for Utah Children and we hope you will be a part of our next 30 years.

Special thanks to American Express for sponsoring our 30th Anniversary Year. Amex

Published in News & Blog

Voices for Utah Children Supports HB 294, the Utah Intergenerational Poverty Work and Self-sufficiency Tax Credit. HB 294 strengthens Utah’s groundbreaking Intergenerational Poverty (IGP) initiative with an Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC). Twenty-six other states across the nation and across the political spectrum have already created state EITCs, boosting work, independence, and self-sufficiency for low-income families. Utah should too, starting with our most at-risk population, the 37,512 adults and 57,602 kids grappling with intergenerational poverty (comprising 25% of all adults receiving public assistance, 62% of whom worked in 2015).

How would the IGP EITC work? (HB 294)

It would create a state EITC for IGP families that work, qualify for the federal EITC, and file their state taxes

How much would families receive?

10% of the federal EITC: ~$250 on average, up to ~$600, depending on income and # of kids

For more information, see the complete factsheet:

pdfVote Yes on HB 294: The IGP EITC


For 30 years now, Voices for Utah Children has called on our state, federal and local leaders to put children’s needs first. But the work is not done. The children of 30 years ago now have children of their own. Too many of these children are growing up in poverty, without access to healthcare or quality educational opportunities.

How can you be involved?

Make a tax-deductible donation to Voices for Utah Children—or join our Network with a monthly donation of $20 or more.  Network membership includes complimentary admission to Network events with food, socializing, and opportunity to meet child advocacy experts. And don't forget to join our listserv to stay informed!

We look forward to the future of Voices for Utah Children and we hope you will be a part of our next 30 years.

Special thanks to American Express, our "Making a Difference All Year Long" sponsor. Amex

 

Published in News & Blog

Like most juvenile justice systems across the country, Utah's juvenile justice system could do more to produce the outcomes that we all want for our kids and communities. Our system should be restructured to more effectively ensure that as many kids as possible can stay in their homes and in their schools, instead of being detained in environments that don't lead to justice or positive change.

Voices for Utah Children, in partnership with multiple community stakeholders - including the the ACLU of Utah, YWCA of Utah, Racially Just Utah and Ogden Branch NAACP – has released a new report detailing serious racial disparities in Utah’s Juvenile Justice System

Using data collected and compiled by an official Juvenile Justice Working Group, and assisted by the Pew Charitable Trust, the report reveals stark racial disparities including the following:

  • Black/African-American youth make up 1% of Utah’s youth population, but they represent 12% of all kids placed with the Utah Division of Child and Family Services through the juvenile justice system.
  • In one judicial district, Latino/Hispanic youth make up 24% of the youth population - but 52% of all “secure care” dispositions resulting in out-of-home detention for these youth.
  • In another district, Native American youth make up 9% of the overall youth population, yet 41% of “secure care” disposition are imposed on Native American youth.

The report offers five recommendations to reduce racial disparities in Utah's juvenile justice system:

  1. Pass, and implement with fidelity, legislation based on the robust recommendations of the Juvenile Justice Working Group.
  2. Adopt a comprehensive, youth-centric vision for Utah’s Juvenile Justice system.
  3. End unnecessary referrals of youth from schools into the juvenile justice system.
  4. End the practice of tracking youth in undisclosed, non-transparent law enforcement databases.
  5. Empower and invigorate Utah’s Disproportionate Minority Contact Subcommittee to reduce racial disparities in the juvenile justice system.

 

Read the full report:

pdfRacial Disparities in Utah’s Juvenile Justice System

Take Action Today!

Ask your legislator to support H.B. 239, Juvenile Justice Amendments, sponsored by Rep. Lowry Snow and Sen. Todd Weiler. This bill would offer some common-sense reforms to Utah's juvenile justice system including:

  • Keeping kids out of court for low-level status offenses like truancy.
  • Bringing much-needed structure to the sentencing process in the juvenile justice system.
  • Ensuring that kids don't spend time in detention just because they can't pay restitutions and fines.
  • Creating specific performance requirements for community placement programs.

Overall, this bill will bring much-needed structure to juvenile sentencing, and require important training for system workers. Young people, who might in the past have been inappropriately sent into juvenile court, will now have access to community-based and school-based interventions that offer more opportunities for positive change.

It is time to begin systemic reform to address these issues.
Use this simple form to tell your legislator to support H.B. 239
Juvenile Justice Amendments


For 30 years now, Voices for Utah Children has called on our state, federal and local leaders to put children’s needs first. But the work is not done. The children of 30 years ago now have children of their own. Too many of these children are growing up in poverty, without access to healthcare or quality educational opportunities.

How can you be involved?

Make a tax-deductible donation to Voices for Utah Children—or join our Network with a monthly donation of $20 or more.  Network membership includes complimentary admission to Network events with food, socializing, and opportunity to meet child advocacy experts. And don't forget to join our listserv to stay informed!

We look forward to the future of Voices for Utah Children and we hope you will be a part of our next 30 years.

Special thanks to American Express, our "Making a Difference All Year Long" sponsor. Amex

 

Published in News & Blog

New factsheets by the University of Utah School of Medicine describe two policy solutions that would help Utah families obtain healthcare they need to plan and space their pregnancies in order to better achieve the best health outcomes for the mother and child. In addition to promoting health, these solutions are cost-effective.

A Medicaid State Plan Amendment (SPA) allows family planning coverage for individuals that do not qualify for full Medicaid benefits. Expanding family planning coverage would maximize the the federal match and support the health of Utah families. There are 28 states that take advantage of the option to offer family planning coverage for individuals that do not qualify for full Medicaid benefits. These existing programs have proven to be budget neutral or cost-saving.

Long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARC) are highly effective contraception devices with minimal side effects that can be safely inserted immediately following delivery or during the mother's hospital stay. However, current Medicaid reimbursement procedures create a disincentive to offering LARC in this context. Unbundling LARC insertions from the global fee could improve access to this effective option.

For more information, see the complete fact sheets:

pdfExpanding Family Planning Coverage with Medicaid

pdfExpanding Options for Postpartum Contraception


For 30 years now, Voices for Utah Children has called on our state, federal and local leaders to put children’s needs first. But the work is not done. The children of 30 years ago now have children of their own. Too many of these children are growing up in poverty, without access to healthcare or quality educational opportunities.

How can you be involved?

Make a tax-deductible donation to Voices for Utah Children—or join our Network with a monthly donation of $20 or more.  Network membership includes complimentary admission to Network events with food, socializing, and opportunity to meet child advocacy experts. And don't forget to join our listserv to stay informed!

We look forward to the future of Voices for Utah Children and we hope you will be a part of our next 30 years.

Special thanks to American Express, our "Making a Difference All Year Long" sponsor. Amex

 

Published in News & Blog

Why We Care About Medicaid “EPSDT” Benefits
and So Should You

While threats to the Affordable Care Act (ACA) may seem the most imminent in our current political landscape, Medicaid is also under attack. Congress and the new administration are discussing deep cuts and changes to the Medicaid program, through Medicaid block grants or per capita program caps. The new administration recently said they will be proposing block grants

Medicaid block grants result in funding cuts and fewer people receiving coverage. Utah has long been recognized as a leader in health care innovation, but our ability to innovate will be severely impaired if we experience cuts to our foundational health care safety-net system through block grants. Medicaid is the cornerstone to children’s health coverage in Utah.

In a recent letter to Congress on January 13th, the Governor and state officials weighed in on a number of health reform proposals, including Medicaid. We saw many areas for concern in our state leaders’ letter; one brief recommendation in particular jumped out at us, because it would have significant and long-lasting consequences for children and families:

“Reevaluate the EPDST (Early Period Screening, Diagnosis and Treatment) benefit for children. EPDST requires states to provide comprehensive and preventative health services for Medicaid beneficiaries under the age of 21 with few limitations.
Consider limiting benefits to what is available in the private market. Currently, children on Medicaid have more access to services and benefits than children who are covered under good commercial plans.”

So, what is EPSDT?

Early, Periodic Screenings, Diagnosis & Treatment

Utah Medicaid Long TermThe EPSDT benefit, known in Utah as “CHEC” or Children’s Health Evaluation and Care, is one of the hallmarks of the Medicaid program. The Medicaid Act currently requires states to provide children with a comprehensive scope of services. For decades, EPSDT has allowed providers to catch potential health problems early, when they are easiest to treat and children stand the best chance of developing to their fullest potential. Covered EPSDT services include basic preventative care, such as dental and vision services, plus services needed to address acute, long-term, and disabling conditions, such as physical, speech and behavioral health therapies and in-home nursing. The EPSDT benefit is considered the gold standard for children’s pediatric benefits. It helps doctors determine the best level of care for their patient.

EPSDT has helped millions of children, especially children with special health care needs, receive the level of the care they need. In fact, many families in the private insurance market will turn to Medicaid coverage for their children with special health care needs-- because they cannot afford such comprehensive benefits in their “good” commercial plan.

We Need to Protect EPSDT

Medicaid is the cornerstone for children’s health coverage in our state, and serves over 20% of our most vulnerable families. If we roll-back the EPSDT benefit, we will see a surge of parents no longer able to afford care, particularly for children with special health care needs.
EPSDT protects families; it assures families that they can receive a minimum level of coverage and have access to services that meet prevailing standards of care. For many higher-income families, Medicaid may seem unconnected to their day-to-day lives. But one of the core tenets of our health care safety-net is that it is there for families when they need it.

There are many improvements needed to our Medicaid program. But the EPSDT benefit package is not one of them. So why fix what isn’t broken? Instead, for example, Medicaid mental and behavioral health services should be better integrated and aligned with physical health benefits.
Instead of trying to raise health care standards for all kids, our state and federal leaders are instead looking to dilute standards. It is perverse logic to limit progress and roll-back gains, in order to achieve equality. Instead we should advance the progress made so all children can achieve affordable, comprehensive coverage.

We urge our state and federal leaders:

Do not limit benefits for children and weaken our existing standards.
Build on the progress we have made.
Strengthen coverage and care for all Utah children.


For 30 years now, Voices for Utah Children has called on our state, federal and local leaders to put children’s needs first. But the work is not done. The children of 30 years ago now have children of their own. Too many of these children are growing up in poverty, without access to healthcare or quality educational opportunities.

How can you be involved?

Make a tax-deductible donation to Voices for Utah Children—or join our Network with a monthly donation of $20 or more.  Network membership includes complimentary admission to Network events with food, socializing, and opportunity to meet child advocacy experts. And don't forget to join our listserv to stay informed!

We look forward to the future of Voices for Utah Children and we hope you will be a part of our next 30 years.

Special thanks to American Express, our "Making a Difference All Year Long" sponsor. Amex

 

Published in News & Blog

Oral Health Care for Children and Families

school oral healthTooth decay is the top preventable disease for kids. When kids experience poor oral health, their school attendance and grades are likely to suffer. Kids experiencing dental pain cannot concentrate in school and fully participate in activities. What’s more, oral health decay can lead to other serious medical problems. An estimated 65% of Utah children have experienced a dental cavity by the time they are 9-years-old.

The best way to treat cavities is through prevention: we can prevent oral health problems before they occur. But many families have trouble accessing affordable dental care for their kids. Working parents may not be able to get the time off for a routine visit. Low-income children, children of color and children in rural areas have an even harder time accessing a dentist in their communities. According to a recent Department of Health report, Hispanic children were five times more likely to report having unmet dental health needs compared to White children. 

School-based prevention or sealant programs are one of the best ways to ensure all kids can receive affordable, preventative oral health care.

We need to help more children access school-based sealant programs and affordable care. Voices for Utah Children supports policies that expand dental care access for all children including:

  • Changes to the Utah Medicaid dental program to better meet the needs of low-income families and expand school-based care, including reimbursing for patient assessment in a public health settings (Medicaid code D0191).
  • Expanding Medicaid and CHIP oral health quality performance measures, monitoring and evaluation to improve kids’ utilization of preventive care visits.
  • Expanding dental health benefits for children in the marketplace, including a more robust pediatric dental benefit package and embedding children’s dental health benefits into all plans.
  • A comprehensive state plan to address oral health access disparities experienced by low-income children, children of color, and children in rural areas across the state.

Our children should not be falling behind due to cavities or oral health pain. Together we can strengthen our pediatric oral health system so all kids can succeed.

Image Credit: © Oksun70 | Dreamstime.com - Kid Girl Brushing Teeth In Bathroom Photo

Image Credit: American Dental Association


For 30 years now, Voices for Utah Children has called on our state, federal and local leaders to put children’s needs first. But the work is not done. The children of 30 years ago now have children of their own. Too many of these children are growing up in poverty, without access to healthcare or quality educational opportunities.

How can you be involved?

Make a tax-deductible donation to Voices for Utah Children—or join our Network with a monthly donation of $20 or more.  Network membership includes complimentary admission to Network events with food, socializing, and opportunity to meet child advocacy experts. And don't forget to join our listserv to stay informed!

We look forward to the future of Voices for Utah Children and we hope you will be a part of our next 30 years.

Special thanks to American Express, our "Making a Difference All Year Long" sponsor. Amex

 

Published in News & Blog
Tagged under

health insurance foundation

Medicaid, CHIP (the Children’s Health Insurance Program) and the Affordable Care Act (ACA) form the foundation of children’s health coverage. These programs are deeply connected to one another and our overall state safety net system. Federal and state lawmakers are proposing and enacting proposals that undermine ACA, CHIP and Medicaid. A repeal, cut or restructure of one program affects the others, and puts the care of Utah children and families at risk.

Thanks to the ACA, Medicaid and CHIP, we have seen the rate of uninsured Utah children drop from 11% in 2011 to a historic low of 6% in 2016. We cannot afford to let child health coverage, adequacy, and affordability move backwards. We must ensure that we sustain and build on our unprecedented success in covering children.

Medicaid is the cornerstone for children’s health coverage. Our state leaders must support the continued stability and affordability of the Medicaid program. Medicaid is the safety net health care program for low-income children. Over 200,000 Utah children rely on Medicaid insurance coverage, and its pediatric benefits are considered the gold standard for child health, particularly for children and youth with special health care needs. Changes to Medicaid’s financing structure through a block grant or per capita cap would undermine the program’s integrity by creating gaps in state funding. They would likely lead to limits placed on the programs, such as a reduction in benefits or fewer kids covered. Proposals to promote state innovation need to strengthen our safety net for kids and families, not weaken it.

Block grants or per capita caps would undermine Medicaid program integrity. Changes to Medicaid’s financing structure through a block grant or per capita cap would create large shortfalls in state funding. Learn more about hCoverage in Utah for kids infographicow block grants would harm Utah's budget.

Extend funding for CHIP for at least five years. A robust, long-term extension of CHIP funding for at least five years would help stabilize coverage for the 8.9 million U.S. children who rely on CHIP and provide certainty to Utah amid potentially significant changes to the broader coverage landscape. Learn more about CHIP.

Children must not lose any ground. Unraveling the ACA without a replacement plan attached threatens the health of children and families. There are 38,000 Utah children enrolled in ACA, or marketplace, coverage. At least 87% of Utahns enrolled in the exchange are receiving subsidies. The ACA provides protections for children and families, increases affordability and establishes evidence-based essential health benefits.

Extend Medicaid Coverage for Parents. Medicaid coverage for parents benefits the whole family. Yet thousands of Utah families are unable to receive Medicaid coverage, falling into the Medicaid ‘coverage gap.’ As a result, the family is at increased financial risk. Moreover, children are more likely to be uninsured. It is time to close the coverage for all parents and individuals. Learn more about citizen initiatives to close the coverage gap.

Working families depend on these vital health care programs. What is at stake if the ACA is repealed without a replacement, or changes are made to CHIP and Medicaid?

  • The number of uninsured Utah children would more than double. By 2019, at least 141,000 children would be uninsured.
  • The number of uninsured Utah parents would jump from 82,000 to 171,000. Research shows that children are better off when their parents have health insurance coverage.
  • Families and individuals would lose protection from exclusions and discrimination. Approximately 1.2 million Utahns – including 411,000 children- no longer experience lifetime limits on coverage now that the ACA is in effect.

We are putting our children’s future at risk by failing to guarantee Utah children and families have stable health insurance coverage. All children and families need consistent, comprehensive and affordable care.

Medicaid Helps Utah Children Get the Health Care They Need to Succeed from Georgetown CCF on Vimeo.

Printer-friendly Version:

pdf Preserve and Protect Health Coverage for Utah Children and Families

Additional Materials

Utah Children and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Healthcare Repeal Bill

Utah Snapshot of Children's Coverage: How Medicaid, CHIP, and the ACA Cover ChildrenHow Medicaid, CHIP, and the ACA Cover Children

In Support of Medicaid Standards for Children

Block grants or per capita caps would undermine the Medicaid program.

Number of Uninsured Utah Kids and Parents Would More than Double if ACA Repealed

The ACA Gave a Needed Boost to Utah’s Latino Child Health Insurance Rate

Tell Senator Hatch Not to Repeal the ACA without Replacing It

Defending Health Care in 2017: What Is at Stake for Utah

273,000 Utah Residents Would Lose Coverage in 2019 Under ACA Repeal2019 Under ACA Repeal

What Would Block Grants or Limits on Per Capita Spending Mean for Medicaid?

Fact Sheet: Per Capita Caps vs. Block Grants in Medicaid


For 30 years now, Voices for Utah Children has called on our state, federal and local leaders to put children’s needs first. But the work is not done. The children of 30 years ago now have children of their own. Too many of these children are growing up in poverty, without access to healthcare or quality educational opportunities.

How can you be involved?

Make a tax-deductible donation to Voices for Utah Children—or join our Network with a monthly donation of $20 or more.  Network membership includes complimentary admission to Network events with food, socializing, and opportunity to meet child advocacy experts. And don't forget to join our listserv to stay informed!

We look forward to the future of Voices for Utah Children and we hope you will be a part of our next 30 years.

Special thanks to American Express, our "Making a Difference All Year Long" sponsor. Amex

 

Published in News & Blog
February 14, 2019

Healthy Moms = Healthy Kids

Maternal 1

Maternal 2

For Printable Version pdfMaternal Mental Health Support Flyer


For 30 years now, Voices for Utah Children has called on our state, federal and local leaders to put children’s needs first. But the work is not done. The children of 30 years ago now have children of their own. Too many of these children are growing up in poverty, without access to healthcare or quality educational opportunities.

How can you be involved?

Make a tax-deductible donation to Voices for Utah Children—or join our Network with a monthly donation of $20 or more.  Network membership includes complimentary admission to Network events with food, socializing, and opportunity to meet child advocacy experts. And don't forget to join our listserv to stay informed!

We look forward to the future of Voices for Utah Children and we hope you will be a part of our next 30 years.

Special thanks to American Express, our "Making a Difference All Year Long" sponsor. Amex

 

Published in News & Blog

 

The federal Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) lifts 60,000 Utahns out of poverty each year, half of them children, by letting low-income families keep more of what they earn.

EITC helps working families make ends meet.

EITC keeps families working.

EITC reduces poverty, especially among children.

EITC put $426 mil. back into Utah’s economy in 2017.

A state EITC targeted to families living in intergenerational poverty (IGP) will give a boost to the 25,000 working families who qualify for the federal EITC and file state taxes.

It will ensure that eligible working families receive 10% of federal EITC - up to $640 depending on income and number of children.

A state EITC may increase participation in the federal EITC. Only 75% of tax filers take advantage of the federal EITC

No bureaucracy or staff to administer.

 

FISCAL IMPACT

$6 million from General Fund which is a small portion of the over $25 million in state and local taxes paid every year by these working families.

Simply put, 58,820 children identified as living in intergenerational poverty amounts to $102 per child.

 

STATES WITH A STATE EITC

Twenty-nine states across the nation and political spectrum have created state EITCs.

 

EITC has strong bipartisan support

 “… the proposed EITC helps people who are ready and able to help themselves escape intergenerational poverty through work…It is both sound economic policy and prudent welfare policy… It is good for those in poverty, good for the economy, and good for taxpayers as well.” Sutherland Institute

“I know of no public policy innovation over the past 30 years to help low-income individuals that has as much promise as Utah’s intergenerational poverty work. When combined with an EITC, Utah will be able to show the nation how public policies that are targeted, incentivize work, are fiscally constrained and include measurable outcomes are the best way to help families and children with great need.”

Natalie Gochnour

Associate Dean, David Eccles School of Business,

University of Utah, Deseret News column, March 1, 2018

 


For 30 years now, Voices for Utah Children has called on our state, federal and local leaders to put children’s needs first. But the work is not done. The children of 30 years ago now have children of their own. Too many of these children are growing up in poverty, without access to healthcare or quality educational opportunities.

How can you be involved?

Make a tax-deductible donation to Voices for Utah Children—or join our Network with a monthly donation of $20 or more.  Network membership includes complimentary admission to Network events with food, socializing, and opportunity to meet child advocacy experts. And don't forget to join our listserv to stay informed!

We look forward to the future of Voices for Utah Children and we hope you will be a part of our next 30 years.

Special thanks to American Express, our "Making a Difference All Year Long" sponsor. Amex

Published in News & Blog